Searched for: author%3A%22Klenk%2C+M.B.O.T.%22
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
Generative AI enables automated, effective manipulation at scale. Despite the growing general ethical discussion around generative AI, the specific manipulation risks remain inadequately investigated. This article outlines essential inquiries encompassing conceptual, empirical, and design dimensions of manipulation, pivotal for comprehending...
journal article 2024
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author), van de Poel, I.R. (author)
We examine whether Thomsonian constitutivism, a metaethical view that analyses value in terms of ‘goodness-fixing kinds,’ i.e. kinds that themselves set the standards for being a good instance of the respective kind, offers a satisfactory explanation of value change and disagreement. While value disagreement has long been considered an important...
journal article 2023
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
A series of recent papers raises worries about the manipulative potential of algorithmic transparency (to wit, making visible the factors that influence an algorithm’s output). But while the concern is apt and relevant, it is based on a fraught understanding of manipulation. Therefore, this paper draws attention to the ‘indifference view’ of...
journal article 2023
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Hopster, J. (author), Brey, P. (author), Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author), Löhr, G. (author), Marchiori, S. (author), Lundgren, B. (author), Scharp, K. (author)
This chapter provides a theoretical lens on conceptual disruption. It offers a typology of conceptual disruption, discusses its relation to conceptual engineering, and sketches a programmatic view of the implications of conceptual disruption for the ethics of technology. We begin by distinguishing between three different kinds of conceptual...
book chapter 2023
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author), O’Neill, Elizabeth (author), Arora, Chirag (author), Blunden, Charlie (author), Eriksen, Cecilie (author), Hopster, Jeroen (author), Frank, Lily (author)
In the last few decades, several philosophers have written on the topic of moral revolutions, distinguishing them from other kinds of society-level moral change. This article surveys recent accounts of moral revolutions in moral philosophy. Different authors use quite different criteria to pick out moral revolutions. Features treated as relevant...
journal article 2022
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Hopster, Jeroen (author), Arora, Chirag (author), Blunden, Charlie (author), Eriksen, Cecilie (author), Frank, Lily (author), hermann, Julia (author), Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author), Steinert, S. (author)
The power of technology to transform religions, science, and political institutions has often been presented as nothing short of revolutionary. Does technology have a similarly transformative influence on societies’ morality? Scholars have not rigorously investigated the role of technology in moral revolutions, even though existing research on...
journal article 2022
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
Several anti-debunkers have argued that evolutionary explanations of our moral beliefs fail to meet a necessary condition on undermining defeat called modal security. They conclude that evolution, therefore, does not debunk our moral beliefs. This article shows that modal security is false if knowledge is virtuous achievement. New information...
journal article 2022
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Jongepier, Fleur (author), Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
Are we being manipulated online? If so, is being manipulated by online technologies and algorithmic systems notably different from human forms of manipulation? And what is under threat exactly when people are manipulated online? This volume provides philosophical and conceptual depth to debates in digital ethics about online manipulation. The...
book 2022
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Jongepier, Fleur (author), Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
This chapter provides an overview of the key debates and concepts relevant to online manipulation. First, it introduces and critically discusses three preliminary methodological questions concerning the method used to study manipulation (online), the normative charge of the concept, and the level and type of intentionality required to manipulate...
book chapter 2022
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Jongepier, Fleur (author), Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
This chapter introduces the themes and questions addressed in this volume on the philosophy of online manipulation. It lays out the reasons for considering that online manipulation is an intellectually interesting and practically problematic phenomenon and raises the questions of whether online manipulation differs from other types of...
book chapter 2022
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
This chapter defends the view that manipulated behaviour is explained by an injustice. Injustices that explain manipulated behaviour need not involve agential features such as intentionality. Therefore, technology can manipulate us, even if technological artefacts like robots, intelligent software agents, or other ‘mere tools’ lack agential...
book chapter 2022
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
Most non-robust-realist metaethical theories, such as expressivism, constructivism, and non-robust forms of realism, claim to retain a sense of objectivity in ethics. A persistent issue for these theories is to identify an objective criterion for moral truth that meets their objectivist aspiration. Objectivist aspirations are often probed by...
journal article 2021
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
The standard way to test alternative descriptive theories of moral judgment is by asking subjects to evaluate (amongst others) sacrificial dilemmas, where acting classifies as a utilitarian moral judgment and not acting classifies as a deontological moral judgment. Previous research uncovered many situational factors that alter subject’s...
journal article 2021
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author), Sauer, Hanno (author)
We propose a fundamental challenge to the feasibility of moral progress: most extant theories of progress, we will argue, assume an unrealistic level of cognitive control people must have over their moral judgments for moral progress to occur. Moral progress depends at least in part on the possibility of individual people improving their...
journal article 2021
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Sand, M. (author), Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
journal article 2021
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
Ever-increasing numbers of human interactions with intelligent software agents, online and offline, and their increasing ability to influence humans have prompted a surge in attention toward the concept of (online) manipulation. Several scholars have argued that manipulative influence is always hidden. But manipulation is sometimes overt, and...
journal article 2021
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
Moral disagreement is often thought to be of great metaethical significance for moral realists. I explore what remains of that significance when we look at moral disagreement through the lens of a combination of two influential and independently plausible hypotheses about moral language. The Morality-As-Cooperation (MAC) hypothesis says that our...
journal article 2021
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author), van de Poel, I.R. (author)
Pandemics like COVID-19 confront us with decisions about life and death that come with great uncertainty, factual as well as moral. How should policy makers deal with such uncertainty? We suggest that rather than to deliberate until they have found the right course of action, they better do moral experiments that generate relevant experiences...
journal article 2021
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Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
I stipulate that an academic discipline is societally relevant insofar as it helps to resolve a society’s real problems. What makes such a view correct depends on meta-normative views. I show how one’s meta-normative view significantly determines the likelihood that disciplinary philosophy is of societal relevance. On normative non-naturalism,...
book chapter 2020
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Sand, M. (author), Klenk, M.B.O.T. (author)
A prominent view in contemporary philosophy of technology suggests that more technology implies more possibilities and, therefore, more responsibilities. Consequently, the question ‘What technology?’ is discussed primarily on the backdrop of assessing, assigning, and avoiding technology- borne culpability. The view is reminiscent of the Olympian...
book chapter 2020
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