Searched for: subject%3A%22Simulator%255C+Sickness%22
(1 - 4 of 4)
document
Kotian, V. (author), Pool, D.M. (author), Happee, R. (author)
Users of automated vehicles will move away from being drivers to passengers, preferably engaged in other activities such as reading or using laptops and smartphones, which will strongly increase susceptibility to motion sickness. Similarly, in driving simulators, the presented visual motion with scaled or even without any physical motion causes...
conference paper 2023
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Talsma, Tessa (author)
Higher levels of automation in driving may allow drivers to engage in other activities, but may also increase the likelihood of Motion Sickness (MS). The exact causes of MS are not well understood, and various susceptibility factors(e.g. age, gender, ethnicity) can cause large individual differences. To better understand and predict MS, it is...
master thesis 2022
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Hogerbrug, M. (author), Venrooij, J. (author), Pool, D.M. (author), Mulder, Max (author)
A necessity in driving simulation testing is to understand and attenuate simulator sickness, to reduce the number of undesired drop-outs. Especially urban environments, with its many turns and changes in the velocity profile, are a challenge. This paper describes the motion sickness rating results of a between-subjects experiment (n = 63), which...
conference paper 2020
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Hogerbrug, Marc (author)
A necessity in driving simulation testing is to understand and attenuate simulator sickness in urban environments to reduce the number of undesired drop-outs. This final thesis explains a 6 degree-of-freedom simulator sickness prediction model based on observer theory including the visual system. The model incorporates state-of-the-art knowledge...
master thesis 2019
Searched for: subject%3A%22Simulator%255C+Sickness%22
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