Searched for: subject%3A%22residential%255C+self%255C-selection%22
(1 - 10 of 10)
document
Tao, Y. (author)
The causal impact of the built environment on travel behaviours is a subject of debate. This debate especially concerns the independent effect of the built environment on the observed travel patterns after taking into account residential self-selection arising from pre-existing travel-related attitude. This study argues that travel attitude...
journal article 2024
document
Tao, Y. (author), Petrović, A. (author), van Ham, M. (author), Fu, Xingxing (author)
Residential self-selection studies argue that pre-existing travel-related attitude overshadows the role of changes in residential built environment in (re)shaping travel behaviours. Our study contributes to this self-selection argument by including family- and job-related life events as another self-selection source, and accounting for the...
journal article 2023
document
Andringa, Gerben (author)
Many cities are planning car-reduced neighbourhoods, to provide more housing and stimulate sustainable mobility. Nonetheless, it is important to know what potential residents value, to be able to attract them. This study investigated the preferences of potential residents regarding the accessibility of car-reduced neighbourhoods, available...
master thesis 2022
document
van de Coevering, P.P. (author), Maat, C. (author), van Wee, G.P. (author)
Travel-related attitudes are believed to affect the connections between the built environment and travel behaviour. Previous studies found supporting evidence for the residential self-selection hypothesis which suggests that the impact of the built environment on travel behaviour could be overestimated when attitudes are not accounted for....
journal article 2021
document
Faber, R.M. (author), Merkies, Raimbard (author), Damen, Wouter (author), Oirbans, Leonard (author), Massa, Davide (author), Kroesen, M. (author), Molin, E.J.E. (author)
Residential self-selection (RSS) is the theoretical mechanism that explains that the impact of the built environment on travel behaviour is weaker than bivariate correlations suggest, because mode attitudes influence both the built environment and travel behaviour and therefore at least partially account for the bivariate relationship....
journal article 2021
document
Kroesen, M. (author)
Residential self-selection is a well-recognized potential bias in estimating the true effects of the built environment on travel behavior. A popular method to account for residential self-selection is by including people's attitudes towards various modes as additional control variables in the regression. Yet, while attitudes may indeed...
journal article 2019
document
van de Coevering, P.P. (author), Maat, C. (author), van Wee, G.P. (author)
Travel-related attitudes and dissonance between attitudes and the characteristics of the residential built environment are believed to play an important role in the effectiveness of land use policies that aim to influence travel behaviour. To date, research on the nature and directions of causality of the links between these variables has...
journal article 2018
document
van de Coevering, P.P. (author), Maat, C. (author), Kroesen, M. (author), van Wee, G.P. (author)
The influence of the built environment on travel behaviour and the role of intervening variables such as socio-demographics and travel-related attitudes have long been debated in the literature. To date, most empirical studies have applied cross-sectional designs to investigate their bidirectional relationships. However, these designs provide...
journal article 2016
document
Bohte, W. (author)
Most Western national governments aim to influence individual travel patterns – at least to some degree – through spatial planning in residential areas. Nevertheless, the extent to which the characteristics of the built environment influence travel behaviour remains the subject of some debate among travel behaviour researchers. This thesis...
book 2010
document
Bohte, W. (author)
Most Western national governments aim to influence individual travel patterns – at least to some degree – through spatial planning in residential areas. Nevertheless, the extent to which the characteristics of the built environment influence travel behaviour remains the subject of some debate among travel behaviour researchers. This thesis...
doctoral thesis 2010
Searched for: subject%3A%22residential%255C+self%255C-selection%22
(1 - 10 of 10)