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A prospective study of dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of endometrial, ovarian, and breast cancer

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Author: Hogervorst, J.G. · Schouten, L.J. · Konings, E.J. · Goldbohm, R.A. · Brandt, P.A. van den
Type:article
Date:2007
Institution: TNO Kwaliteit van Leven
Source:Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 11, 16, 2304-2313
Identifier: 240267
doi: doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0581
Keywords: HealthHealth · Food and Chemical Risk Analysis · acrylamide · adult · breast cancer · cancer risk · case study · chemical analysis · cohort analysis · comparative study · confidence interval · controlled study · dietary intake · endometrium cancer · follow up · food intake · hazard ratio · major clinical study · ovary cancer · questionnaire · Acrylamide · Aged · Breast Neoplasms · Cohort Studies · Diet · Diet Surveys · Endometrial Neoplasms · Female · Humans · Middle Aged · Netherlands · Ovarian Neoplasms · Postmenopause · Prospective Studies · Risk Factors · Smoking

Abstract

Background: Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, was detected in various heat-treated carbohydrate-rich foods in 2002. The few epidemiologic studies done thus far have not shown a relationship with cancer. Our aim was to investigate the association between acrylamide intake and endometrial, ovarian, and breast cancer risk. Methods: The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer includes 62,573 women, aged 55-69 years. At baseline (1986), a random subcohort of 2,589 women was selected using a case cohort analysis approach for analysis. The acrylamide intake of subcohort members and cases was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire and was based on chemical analysis of all relevant Dutch foods. Subgroup analyses were done for never-smokers to eliminate the influence of smoking; an important source of acrylamide. Results: After 11.3 years of follow-up, 327, 300, and 1,835 cases of endometrial, ovarian, and breast cancer, respectively, were documented. Compared with the lowest quintile of acrylamide intake (mean intake, 8.9 μg/day), multivariable-adjusted hazard rate ratios (HR) for endometrial, ovarian, and breast cancer in the highest quintile (mean intake, 40.2 μg/day) were 1.29 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.81-2.07; Ptrend = 0.18], 1.78 (95% CI, 1.10-2.88; Ptrend = 0.02), and 0.93 (95% CI, 0.73-1.19; Ptrend = 0.79), respectively. For never-smokers, the corresponding HRs were 1.99 (95% CI, 1.12-3.52; P trend = 0.03), 2.22 (95% CI, 1.20-4.08; Ptrend = 0.01), and 1.10 (95% CI, 0.80-1.52; Ptrend = 0.55). Conclusions: We observed increased risks of postmenopausal endometrial and ovarian cancer with increasing dietary acrylamide intake, particularly among never-smokers. Risk of breast cancer was not associated with acrylamide intake. Copyright © 2007 American Association for Cancer Research.