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3rd 3D Nanomanufacturing Workshop, 6 November 2017

Type:article
Date:2017
Publisher: TNO
Place: Delft
Identifier: 850575
Keywords: Nanotechnology · High Tech Systems & Materials · Industrial Innovation · Physics & Electronics · NI - Nano Instrumentation · TS - Technical Sciences

Abstract

By end of 2017 there will be more than 8.4 billion connected devices (Gartner 2017). This means for the first time, Internet of Things (IoT) devices will outnumber the world’s population. In 2020, the number of connected devices will increase to more than 20 billion. This means nearly every devices we own or can imagine will be connected to the Internet. The range is from our mobile phones, wearables, home appliances to even our cities. This full integration of data can have an unprecedented impact in our society by better management of water, energy, transportation and safety, and reaching fully sustainable cities. Growth in IoT scales up the demands for more powerful and energy efficient nanodevices. To enable the power and efficiency demand, 1) the device dimensions are shrinking to atomic dimensions and 2) 3D nanoarchitectures have been introduced to achieve new functionalities and to make optimum use of the available space. However, the technologies currently used for production and quality control approach physical boundaries and will no longer be technologically or economically feasible. As a result of both challenges breakthroughs in manufacturing and metrology methods for (3D) nanoarchitectures are required. TNO’s early research program (ERP) 3D Nanomanufacturing, in close collaboration with its industrial and academic partners have established an innovation ecosystem, to bring solutions for nanomanufacturing and nanometrology challenges. Thanks to our industrial partners, the program has a clear long-term focus on real industrial challenges. The solutions are being developed in close collaborations between our academic partners for low Technical Readiness Levels (TRL) and TNO for developing the technology to an acceptable level to be taken over by industry; in short tackling the very high technical risks. Similar to last three years, again this year we organize the Nanomanufacturing Dissemination Workshop. One of the unique and valuable dimensions to this dissemination workshop is the way it brings industrial and academic world together. The workshop disseminates the technical developments which were achieved every year. Our internationally renowned speakers will present the latest achievements in the field and describe the upcoming challenges. Following that, several oral contributions will present the recent developments in this program. Moreover, the detail of the developments will be discussed and presented by poster presentations. This proceeding includes the Keynote and invited talks, oral contributions of the program and more than 50 poster presentations. The reader will discover that both industry challenges and possible solutions are being presented in this proceeding. Finally, we would like to express our deep appreciation to our invited speakers, Dr. Urs Duerig, Prof. Willem Vos, Prof. Paul Koenraad, Dr. Stefan Witte and Dr. Jason Benkoski.