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The effect of oral and product temperature on the perception of flavor and texture attributes of semi-solids

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Author: Engelen, L. · Wijk, R.A.de · Prinz, J.F. · Janssen, A.M. · Weenen, H. · Bosman, F.
Type:article
Date:2003
Source:Appetite, 3, 41, 273-281
Identifier: 237518
doi: doi:10.1016/S0195-6663(03)00105-3
Keywords: Nutrition Packaging · Food and Chemical Risk Analysis · Semi-solids · Temperature · Texture perception · adult · article · controlled study · female · flavor · human · human experiment · lipid diet · low fat diet · male · normal human · perception · sensation · temperature · thickness · Adolescent · Adult · Body Temperature · Dietary Fats · Female · Food Technology · Humans · Male · Mouth · Stereognosis · Taste · Temperature · Temperature Sense · Viscosity

Abstract

This study examined the effect of oral and product temperature on the perception of texture and flavor attributes. A trained panel assessed 21 texture and flavor attributes in one high-fat and one low-fat product of two semi-solids: custard dessert and mayonnaise. The products were evaluated at 10, 22 or 35°C in combination with oral temperatures of 27, 35 and 43°C. Results showed that modulation of product and oral temperature had significant effects on a number of attributes. Flavor intensities, melting mouth feel, and fat after feel increased, while subjective thickness decreased with increasing product temperature. Neither product- nor oral temperature had an effect on over-all creaminess. Oral temperature affected a number of mouth feel attributes: melting, heterogeneous and smooth. Furthermore, large differences existed in ratings between the high- and low-fat products of custard and mayonnaise, and they were more prominent in mayonnaise. We conclude that the effect of oral temperature on the perception of sensory attributes in semi-solids was small, but present, while the product temperatures influenced the ratings greatly. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.