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Evaluation of the intestinal absorption of deoxynivalenol and nivalenol by an in vitro gastrointestinal model, and the binding efficacy of activated carbon and other adsorbent materials

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Author: Avantaggiato, G. · Havenaar, R. · Visconti, A.
Type:article
Date:2004
Institution: TNO Voeding
Source:Food and Chemical Toxicology, 5, 42, 817-824
Identifier: 237726
doi: doi:10.1016/j.fct.2004.01.004
Keywords: Biology Health · Physiological Sciences · Activated carbon · Deoxynivalenol · DON · Gas chromatography · Gastrointestinal · GC · GI · High performance liquid chromatography · HPLC · Mycotoxin detoxification · NIV · Nivalenol · TIM · Gastrointestinal model · ZEA · Zearalenone · activated carbon · adsorbent · mycotoxin · nivalenol · trichothecene derivative · vomitoxin · zearalenone · animal experiment · animal tissue · article · binding affinity · calculation · commercial phenomena · controlled study · detoxification · dynamics · evaluation · food contamination · Fusarium · gastrointestinal tract · in vitro study · intestine absorption · isotherm · jejunum · model · nonhuman · pH · screening · simulation · small intestine absorption · swine · wheat · Adsorption · Animals · Charcoal · Food Contamination · Hydrogen-Ion Concentration · Intestinal Absorption · Intestine, Small · Models, Biological · Swine · Trichothecenes · Fusarium · Triticum aestivum

Abstract

In vitro screening of 14 adsorbent materials, including some commercial products used to detoxify Fusarium-mycotoxins, were tested in the pH range of 3-8 for deoxynivalenol (DON)- and nivalenol (NIV)-binding ability. Only activated carbon showed to be effective with binding capacities of 35.1 μmol and 8.8 μmol DON and NIV/g adsorbent, respectively, calculated from the adsorption isotherms. A dynamic laboratory model simulating the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of healthy pigs (TIM system) was used to evaluate the small-intestinal absorption of DON and NIV and the efficacy of activated carbon in reducing the relevant absorption. The in vitro intestinal absorptions of DON and NIV were 51% and 21%, respectively, as referred to 170 μg DON and 230 μg NIV ingested through contaminated (spiked) wheat. Most absorption occurred in the jejunal compartment for both mycotoxins. The inclusion of activated carbon produced a significant reduction in the intestinal mycotoxin absorption. At 2% inclusion level the absorption with respect to the intake was lowered from 51% to 28% for DON and from 21% to 12% for NIV. The binding activity of activated carbon for these trichothecenes was lower than that observed for zearalenone, a mycotoxin frequently co-occurring with them in naturally contaminated cereals. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.