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Metabolomics in the context of systems biology: Bridging Traditional Chinese Medicine and molecular pharmacology

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Author: Wang, M. · Lamers, R.J.A.N. · Korthout, H.A.A.J. · Nesselrooij, J.H.J. van · Witkamp, R.F. · Heijden, R. van der · Voshol, P.J. · Havekes, L.M. · Verpoorte, R. · Greef, J. van der
Type:article
Date:2005
Institution: TNO Kwaliteit van Leven
Source:Phytotherapy Research, 3, 19, 173-182
Identifier: 238382
doi: doi:10.1002/ptr.1624
Keywords: Health Pharmacology · Analytical research · Metabolomics · Systems biology · Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) · 5' methoxyhdnocarpin · Alanine aminotransferase · Alkaloid · Apolipoprotein E · Berberine · Biflavonoid · Bilobalide · Cannabidiol · Cannabis · Chaconine · Cholesterol · Flavonoid · Ginkgo biloba extract · Ginkgolide · Glucoside · Herbaceous agent · Insulin · Low density lipoprotein · Plant extract · Prodrug · Salicylic acid · Saligenin · Saponin · Solanine · Tetrahydrocannabinol · Triacylglycerol · Unclassified drug · Very low density lipoprotein · Alanine aminotransferase blood level · Animal experiment · Animal model · Atherosclerosis · Bark · Blood flow · Chinese medicine · Clinical pharmacology · Controlled study · Data analysis · DNA microarray · Drug effect · Drug efficacy · Drug potentiation · Drug research · Drug safety · Drug targeting · Female · Ginkgo biloba · Headache · Herbal medicine · High performance liquid chromatography · Human · Human experiment · Insulin resistance · Insulin sensitivity · Ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry · Lipid metabolism · Liver function · Male · Mass spectrometry · Medicinal plant · Metabolic syndrome X · Metabolite · Molecular pharmacology · Nonhuman · Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy · Pain · Phytotherapy · Plant leaf · Proton nuclear magnetic resonance · Rat · Thin layer chromatography · Traditional medicine · Willow · Drugs, Chinese Herbal · Humans · Pharmacology · Phytotherapy

Abstract

The introduction of the concept of systems biology, enabling the study of living systems from a holistic perspective based on the profiling of a multitude of biochemical components, opens up a unique and novel opportunity to reinvestigate natural products. In the study of their bioactivity, the necessary reductionistic approach on single active components has been successful in the discovery of new medicines, but at the same time the synergetic effects of components were lost. Systems biology, and especially metabolomics, is the ultimate phenotyping. It opens up the possibility of studying the effect of complex mixtures, such as those used in Traditional Chinese Medicine, in complex biological systems; abridging it with molecular pharmacology. This approach is considered to have the potential to revolutionize natural product research and to advance the development of scientific based herbal medicine. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.