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Health differences between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment in the Netherlands: A cross-sectional study among Dutch workers

Author: Bouwhuis, S. · Geuskens, G.A. · Boot, C.R.L. · Beek, A.J. van der · Bongers, P.M.
Type:article
Date:2019
Source:PLoS ONE, 9, 14
Identifier: 869330
doi: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0222217
Article number: e0222217
Keywords: Absenteeism · Adult · Burnout · Cross-sectional study · Employee · Employment · Female · Health hazard · Human · Latent class analysis · Major clinical study · Male · Netherlands · Social work · Work environment · Worker

Abstract

Introduction Precarious employment is associated with poor health. Among employees in precarious employment, those with multiple jobs may face additional health risks, e.g. due to combining work schedules and job roles. Our research question is: do differences in health exist between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment? Methods Participants in the Netherlands Working Conditions Survey 2012 aged 25-64 years who were not employed through the Act on Social Work Provision and who had a precarious job were included. To select employees in precarious employment (n = 3,609), latent class analysis was performed, based on variables based on indicators described by Van Aerden. Differences in general self-perceived health, burnout complaints, musculoskeletal health, and sickness absence between multiple and single job holders were studied cross-sectionally using logistic regression analyses. Results No significant differences were found between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment for self-perceived health (OR = 0.9; 95%CI = 0.7-1.3), burnout complaints (OR = 0.9; 95%CI = 0.7-1.2), and musculoskeletal health (OR = 1.1; 95%CI = 0.8-1.5). In crude analyses, multiple job holders experienced less sickness absence than single job holders (OR = 0.7; 95%CI = 0.5-0.9). In adjusted analyses, this difference was no longer statistically significant (OR = 0.8; 95%CI = 0.6-1.0). Conclusions Despite potential health risks related to multiple job holding, we did not find health differences between multiple and single job holders in precarious employment in the Netherlands. More longitudinal research is necessary to provide recommendations for policy makers regarding multiple job holders in precarious employment. © 2019 Bouwhuis et al.