Repository hosted by TU Delft Library

Home · Contact · About · Disclaimer ·
 

Ghrelin response to carbohydrate-enriched breakfast is related to insulin

Publication files not online:

Author: Blom, W.A.M. · Stafleu, A. · Graaf, C.de · Kok, F.J. · Schaafsma, G. · Hendriks, H.F.J.
Type:article
Date:2005
Institution: TNO Kwaliteit van Leven
Source:American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2, 81, 367-375
Identifier: 238927
Keywords: Health · Biomedical Research · Appetite · Breakfast · Carbohydrate · Ghrelin · Glucose · Hunger · Insulin · Leptin · Liquid · Men · Satiation · Satiety · Visual analogue scales · ghrelin · glucose · insulin · leptin · carbohydrate · peptide hormone · adult · appetite · article · caloric intake · carbohydrate analysis · carbohydrate diet · controlled study · glucose blood level · hormone response · human · human experiment · insulin blood level · low calory diet · macronutrient · male · meal · normal human · postprandial state · analysis of variance · area under the curve · blood · chemistry · clinical trial · controlled clinical trial · crossover procedure · dietary fiber · double blind procedure · drug effect · fat intake · metabolism · middle aged · physiology · randomized controlled trial · Adult · Analysis of Variance · Appetite · Area Under Curve · Blood Glucose · Carbohydrates · Cross-Over Studies · Dietary Carbohydrates · Dietary Fats · Dietary Fiber · Double-Blind Method · Humans · Insulin · Leptin · Male · Middle Aged · Peptide Hormones · Postprandial Period

Abstract

Background: Ghrelin plays an important role in the regulation of food intake. Little is known about how ghrelin concentrations are modified by dietary factors. Objective: We examined the effects of both amount and type of carbohydrate on ghrelin concentrations and all correlations among the variables ghrelin, glucose, insulin, leptin, and all 4 subjective measures of appetite. Design: Twenty healthy nonobese men were studied in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Subjective measures of appetite and concentrations of ghrelin, glucose, insulin, and leptin were frequently assessed for 4 h after liquid breakfast meals differing in energy content and carbohydrate structure-ie, water, low-calorie (LC) meal, high-calorie simple carbohydrate (HC-SC) meal, and high-calorie complex carbohydrate (HC-CC) meal. Results: Ghrelin concentrations decreased after the HC-SC breakfast by 41%, after the HC-CC breakfast by 33%, and after the LC breakfast by 24%. No significant differences in ghrelin concentration among the 3 breakfasts were observed until 120 min. Ghrelin concentrations were correlated with subjective measures of hunger (r = 0.51) and fullness (r = -0.44). The percentage decrease in ghrelin between 0 and 30 min was inversely correlated with the percentage increases in insulin (r = -0.76) and glucose (r= -0.79) but not with changes in leptin (r = 0.10). The percentage changes in ghrelin concentrations between 30 and 180 min were correlated with the percentage changes in insulin (r= -0.53) and leptin (r= -0.47) but not with changes in glucose (r = 0.22). Conclusion: The results support the hypothesis that ghrelin requires postgastric feedback, which may be regulated through insulin. © 2005 American Society for Clinical Nutrition.