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Desloratadine shows no effect on performance during 6 h at 8,000 ft simulated cabin altitude

Attachments

Author: Valk, P.J.L. · Roon, D.B. van · Simons, M. · Rikken, G.
Type:article
Date:2004
Source:Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, 5, 75, 433-438
Identifier: 13034
Keywords: Aviation · Aviation · Cognition · Performance · Physiology · Sleep · Vigilance · Cognitive performance · Desloratadine · H1-receptor antagonist · Antihistaminic agent · Desloratadine · Diphenhydramine · Long acting drug · Placebo · Sedative agent · Adult · Airplane crew · Airplane pilot · Alertness · Altitude · Atmospheric pressure · Clinical trial · Cognition · Controlled clinical trial · Crossover procedure · Double blind procedure · Drug effect · Eye tracking · Fatigue · Flight · Flying · Human · Interpersonal communication · Male · Measurement · Normal human · Performance · Pulse oximetry · Randomized controlled trial · Scoring system · Sedation · simulation · single drug dose · Somnolence · Task performance · Administration, Oral · Adolescent · Adult · Aerospace Medicine · Affect · Analysis of Variance · Anti-Allergic Agents · Cross-Over Studies · Diphenhydramine · Double-Blind Method · Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating · Humans · Loratadine · Male · Oximetry · Psychomotor Performance · Sleep · Statistics, Nonparametric

Abstract

Sustained vigilance is required by pilots and crew during flight; therefore, the use of antihistamines with sedating properties is widely prohibited. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of desloratadine, a long-acting, nonsedating antihistamine, on healthy volunteers placed under conditions of simulated cabin pressure. Methods: In a double-blind crossover study, 21 subjects randomly received single doses of desloratadine 5 mg, diphenhydramine 50 mg (active control), and placebo on different days separated by washout periods of 7 d. On test days, predose levels of alertness and fatigue were determined, as were post-dose levels at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 h. Measurements included vigilance and tracking, a multi-attribute task battery, the Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and pulse oximetry. Results: Desloratadine had no detrimental effects on sleepiness or performance of tasks associated with flying ability. Conversely, diphenhydramine (active control) caused significantly more sleepiness than did the placebo [F (2,40) = 6.52, p < 0.01], as well as impaired performance (tracking performance p < 0.05 at 3 h post dose), and an increased percentage of omissions (p < 0.05 at 2 h post dose). Conclusion: A single dose of desloratadine 5 mg did not cause sleepiness and did not impair the performance of tasks associated with flying ability.