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Acute and chronic effects of dinner with alcoholic beverages on nitric oxide metabolites in healthy men

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Author: Sierksma, A. · Gaag, M.S. van der · Grobbee, D.E. · Hendriks, H.F.J.
Type:article
Date:2003
Source:Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, 7, 30, 504-506
Identifier: 237155
doi: doi:10.1046/j.1440-1681.2003.03863.x
Keywords: Health · Physiological Sciences · Ethanol · Food · Nitrate · Nitric oxide · Nitrite · mineral water · nitrate · nitric oxide · nitrite · adult · alcoholic beverage · analysis of variance · article · beer · blood · blood level · cigarette smoking · clinical trial · comparative study · controlled clinical trial · controlled study · crossover procedure · drinking behavior · eating · food intake · gin · human · male · meal · normal human · physiology · postprandial state · randomization · randomized controlled trial · time · wine · Adult · Alcohol Drinking · Alcoholic Beverages · Analysis of Variance · Cross-Over Studies · Eating · Humans · Male · Middle Aged · Nitric Oxide · Postprandial Period · Time Factors

Abstract

1. The present study investigated the acute and chronic effect of dinner with alcoholic beverages on serum nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, namely nitrate and nitrite (NOx), in 11 healthy, non-smoking middle-aged men. 2. In a randomized, diet-controlled, cross-over trial, subjects consumed dinner with four glasses of red wine, beer, spirits (Dutch gin) or sparkling mineral water (control) for 3 weeks. At the end of each 3 week period, serum NOx concentrations were measured just before and 1, 5 and 13 h after dinner. 3. Serum NOx concentrations were approximately 50% higher 1 and 5 h after dinner with any beverage compared with just before dinner (P = 0.0001). At 1 h after dinner, the serum NOx concentration was approximately 11% lower after dinner with alcoholic beverages compared with concentrations observed after dinner with water (P = 0.01). The fasted serum NOx concentration (13 h after dinner) was similar to the preprandial concentration and there were no differences in serum NOx concentrations between the alcoholic beverages. 4. Food intake acutely and transiently increased serum NOx concentrations, an effect that was slightly attenuated if combined with alcoholic beverages. Chronic moderate alcohol consumption had no effect on serum NOx concentration.