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Effect of fortified spread on homocysteine concentration in apparently healthy volunteers

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Author: Vliet, T. van · Jacobs, R.G.J.M. · Deckere, E. de · Berg, H. van den · Bree, A. de · Put, N.M.J. van der
Type:article
Date:2007
Institution: TNO Kwaliteit van Leven
Source:European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 6, 61, 769-778
Identifier: 240013
doi: doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602570
Keywords: Health · Biomedical Research · cyanocobalamin · folic acid · homocysteine · pyridoxine · vitamin B complex · adult · aged · amino acid blood level · article · clinical research · clinical trial · controlled study · double blind procedure · female · folic acid blood level · food intake · human · male · normal human · parallel design · randomized controlled trial · vitamin blood level · vitamin supplementation · volunteer · adolescent · blood · controlled clinical trial · diet supplementation · diet therapy · dose response · hyperhomocysteinemia · middle aged · sex difference · Adolescent · Adult · Aged · Dose-Response Relationship, Drug · Double-Blind Method · Female · Folic Acid · Food, Fortified · Homocysteine · Humans · Hyperhomocysteinemia · Male · Middle Aged · Sex Factors · Vitamin B 12 · Vitamin B 6 · Vitamin B Complex

Abstract

Objective: To determine the effect of folic acid, vitamin B6 and B12 fortified spreads on the blood concentrations of these vitamins and homocysteine. Design and setting: A 6-week randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel trial carried out in a clinical research center. Subjects: One hundred and fifty healthy volunteers (50% males). Interventions: For 6 weeks, the subjects consumed the test spreads (20 g/day): containing per 20 g (1) 200μ g folic acid, 2μ g vitamin B12 and 1 mg vitamin B6, or (2) 400μ g folic acid, 2μ g vitamin B12 and 1 mg vitamin B6 or (3) no B-vitamins (control spread). Results: The B-vitamin status increased on using the test spreads, with the largest effect on the serum folate concentration: 48% in men and 58% in women on spread 1 and 92 and 146%, respectively, on spread 2 (P-values all <0.05). The plasma homocysteine decreased in the groups treated with the fortified spreads as compared to the control group. Average decreases were for males: 0.7±1.5±μmol/l (6.8%) on spread 1 and 1.7 ± 1.7 μmol/l (17.6%) on spread 2 and for females: 1.4 ± 1.2 μmol/l (14.2%) and 2.4 ± 2.0 μmol/l (23.3%), respectively (P-values all <0.05). Conclusions: Consumption of a spread fortified with folic acid, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 for 6 weeks significantly increases the blood concentrations of these vitamins and significantly decreases the plasma concentration of homocysteine. Fortified staple foods like spreads can contribute to the lowering of homocysteine concentrations.