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Blijlevens, J. (author), Hekkert, P.P.M. (author), Thurgood, C. (author)
While some studies have shown that people prefer typical product designs, others have shown that people also like product designs that are new. To reconcile these contradictory findings, the design principle, ‘Most Advanced, Yet Acceptable’ proposes that people prefer a balance of both typicality and novelty in product designs. As an explanation...
conference paper 2014
document
Blijlevens, J. (author), Thurgood, C. (author), Hekkert, P.P.M. (author), Leder, H. (author), Whitfield, T.W.A. (author)
There is a lack of consistency regarding the scales used to measure aesthetic pleasure. They are often chosen ad hoc or derived from other research fields but never validated for design. Moreover, those scales often do not measure aesthetic pleasure in isolation, but instead include its determinants (e.g., novelty). Therefore, we developed a...
conference paper 2014
document
Ludden, G.D.S. (author), Kudrowicz, B.M. (author), Schifferstein, H.N.J. (author), Hekkert, P.P.M. (author)
When information from two or more sensory modalities conflicts, this can evoke a surprise reaction as well as feelings of amusement, interest, confusion or disappointment. In concurrence to joke theory, we argue that people appreciate and enjoy appropriate incongruities that can be related back to the product, whereas they are confused by and...
journal article 2012
document
Ludden, G.D.S. (author), Schifferstein, H.N.J. (author), Hekkert, P. (author)
When people encounter products with visual-tactual incongruities, they are likely to be surprised because the product feels different than expected. In this paper, we investigate (1) the relationship between surprise and the overall liking of the products, (2) the emotions associated with surprise, and (3) the long-term effects of surprise. We...
journal article 2012
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