Underlying Mechanisms for Managing the Cost of Rework Related to Constructability from a Dutch Design and Engineering Firm Perspective

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Abstract

This research aims to identify the underlying mechanisms of the cost of rework related to constructability in Dutch marine infrastructure projects. Despite extensive previous research on the cost of rework, and constructability, the underlying mechanisms within executed projects in the Netherlands have not yet been observed from research. Notwithstanding the thorough previous research, indicates a need to identify the prevailing underlying mechanisms. This research addresses the following main question: What are underlying mechanisms for managing cost of rework related to constructability in Dutch marine infrastructure projects? The known underlying mechanisms for managing the cost of rework related to constructability were derived from the literature. These mechanisms were verified and extended through exploratory semi- structured interviews. The interviewees were senior experts from a client company, a design and engineering firm, and a contractor. Besides, the applied and unapplied mechanisms in Dutch marine infrastructure projects were observed from two case studies. The case studies included further semi- structured interview sessions. The findings from the three sources introduced themes regarding the mechanisms for constructability inclusion. The themes included a set of related mechanisms, which addressed the main research question. The inclusion and application of these themes in the project could minimise the cost of rework related to constructability in Dutch marine infrastructure projects. The most pertinent themes caused the changes and rework observed in the case studies and are indicated as manageable by the design and engineering firm. The identified themes were as follows: 1) extensive transfer, verification, handover, and control of knowledge, documents, models, requirements, needs, and products, 2) inclusion of experienced expertise or knowlegde (early) in the process, and 3) stick to the plan and process by all stakeholders after awarding. Limitation of the research were only two case studies, digital interview sessions, and missing quantification of the mechanisms' contributions and relevance. Some interesting results from this study were the unwillingness to learn, improve, and share previous insights and experiences of person in the Dutch marine infrastructure sector. The diverse perspectives, current market developments of the project approach and contracting, and the human contribution and obstruction were additional findings of this research. The recommendations for practice align with the answer to the main research questions. The most relevant recommendations for practice are the extensive transfer, verification, handover, and control of knowledge, documents, models, requirements, needs, and products, and sticking to the initial plan and process by all stakeholders after awarding the project. Recommendations for further research are 1) to test the validity and causes of the newly identified mechanisms; 2) to identify individual contributions and obstructions to the project, and 3) to quantify the effect of the mechanisms on scope, time, money, quality, personal health, and safety.